Strength and Conditioning Stuff You Should Read: 12/17/18

I hope you had a great weekend. We’re getting back on an every Monday schedule with this recommended reading. Before I get to it, just a quick reminder that I just announced a new date for my one-day shoulder course. It’ll be taking place near Dallas, TX on January 27. You can learn more HERE.

How Rib Cage Positioning Impacts the Pitching Delivery – CSP-MA pitching coordinator Christian Wonders wrote this up last year, and in light of a recent conversation on pitching mechanics, I wanted to bring it back to the forefront.

Fergus Connolly on Winning and Success at Every Level – Fergus is one of the most insightful guys in the sports science world, and this podcast with Mike Robertson is a great example.

The 7 Keys to Longevity with Dr. Jonny Bowden – Jason Ferruggia interviewed Dr. Bowden on his up-to-date thoughts on a variety of topics: nutrition, sleep, stress, and several other factors.

Top Tweet of the Week

Ulnar deviation w/the steel club. If you’re looking for forearm drills for pitchers, here’s a good complement to the pronation/supination exercises I’ve posted in the past. Flexor carpi ulnaris protects the ulnar collateral ligament against valgus stress; this targets it. pic.twitter.com/7Ru1mfDA2C

— Eric Cressey (@EricCressey) December 13, 2018

Top Instagram Post of the Week

 

 
 

 

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Here is an awesome cadaver photo to demonstrate just how little wiggle room there is when dealing with the shoulder. The glenohumeral (ball and socket) joint is maintained in such a small window that it’s possible to say that impingement is a physiological norm. These challenges are even more extreme in the case of structural adaptations and pathology. In other words, we can’t leave any stones unturned in our quest for shoulder health, particularly when one’s sport demands involve high forces and extreme ranges of motion. Anatomy never lies. #cspfamily #Repost @chicagosportsdoc with @get_repost ・・・ Rotator cuff anatomy – A tear into one of these tendons is a common cause of pain and disability among adults. Each year, almost 2 million people in the United States visit their doctors because of a rotator cuff problem.

A post shared by Eric Cressey (@ericcressey) on Dec 2, 2018 at 7:39am PST

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